Brez kategorije

Unemployment, lack of opportunity: I worked for a year and a half for nothing

A picturesque Andalusia, the cradle of Moorish culture, intertwined with Western civilization. The most populated Spanish region, which attracts crowds of tourists with beautiful beaches and historical monuments.

At the same time, it is the poorest Spanish region facing a high unemployment rate, especially among young people. At the same time, there are one of the highest levels of inequality in Europe. And all this last December led to a real search in the Spanish political parquet, when the right-wing party was elected for the first time in three decades in any regional parliament, and Spain became one of the European countries that succumbed to the wave of populism.

In the province with 30% unemployment, opportunities for young people are rare

Nearly one million people live in the province of Cadiz with the same name in the south of Spain – the province has the highest unemployment rate throughout the country, almost 30%, which is four times more than the European average. But the people are tired of the lack of opportunity.

One of them is also Rocio, 30, who still lives with her parents, when she can live an independent life, she does not know. Despite her graduation from chemistry and a number of trainees completed, her monthly salary is now lower than 300 euros. “I thought that when you start working in a company, they get to know you there and then stay in this company. In the end, I realized that I worked more than a year and a half for nothing, in an unpaid job and without any recognition, “She told Enex. A situation that has become a reality for many young people in Europe.

Nevertheless, Rocio will cast her vote in the European elections at the end of May. “If we want change, we have to vote, the situation can not remain the same.”

None of her friends got employment, most of them still studying. Mari Carmen, who holds two degrees in chemistry and environmental science: “It’s a shame, because we’re trained and we want to work, but they do not give us an opportunity,” she says.

The ascent of the far right, which also targets the voices of young people

High unemployment and the degree of inequality are water on the mill to the far right populist parties, many of whom are predicted (many for the first time) managed to get through to the European Parliament. Among them is the far-right Vox, with strong antagonistic positions, which after the historic success in Andalusia also in parliamentary parliamentary elections ranked parliament as the first extreme right-wing party after the fall of the Franciscan dictatorship in 1975 – now it is also aimed at placing it in the European Temple of Democracy .

Populist parties are also gaining increasing support among young voters, members of the t. i. the generation of Z and the generation of the millenia, which, due mainly to traditionally low voter participation, most politicians do not pay enough attention during the pre-election campaign. But this could be a fatal mistake, many experts warn, as many populist parties have taken the opposite tactic, and thus turn increasingly and count on the voices of young people. The French National Front thus appointed only 23-year-old Jordan Bardella as the leading candidate for the list of European elections.

“My son, 36 years old, says he likes Vox. He says he has finally found a party that is a little poorer than others, just like we do,” says Rosario, who lives in La Paz, one of Cadiz’s poorest neighbors .

And for young people who are increasingly aware of the growing inequality in the world and want change, Brussels is becoming increasingly remote, even for the people of Cadiz, where 60 percent of the population voted in 1996, while in the previous elections only 35 percent: “This is a signal for Europe, something has changed in our minds, “says journalist Alejandro Martin, writing for regional El Diario de Cadiz.

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Categories: Brez kategorije

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